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Virtually browse the LSC-North Harris Library Leisure Reading collection to find something that peaks your interest.

Biography

Harriet Tubman, Secret Agent

As he did in his highly acclaimed George Washington, Spymaster, author Thomas B. Allen digs back through historical records to present a famous historical figure in a new light. Readers discover that Harriet Tubman--well-known to them as an ex-slave who led hundreds of her people to freedom along the Underground Railroad--was also a spy for the Union Army. More specifically she worked behind Confederate lines in South Carolina getting information about troop movement and Rebel fortifications from slaves that she was leading to freedom on the Underground Railroad

Every Second Counts

The four-time Tour de France winner and number 1 New York Times bestselling author returns with an inspirational account of his recent personal and professional victories--and some failures--and an intimate glimpse into how almost dying taught him to really live. Since the release of his megabestseller, It's Not About the Bike, Lance Armstrong has enjoyed a new series of thrilling rides, from the birth of his twin daughters, to an astounding succession of Tour de France triumphs, to being chosen as Sportsman of the Year by Sports Illustrated in 2002. Continuing the inspiring story begun in his first book, Every Second Counts captures the mind-set of a man who has beaten incredible odds and considers each day an opportunity for excellence. Armstrong's previous book recounted his journey from a grim diagnosis of testicular cancer, which had spread to his lungs and brain, to a stunning recovery that culminated in his winning the 1999 Tour de France--the ultimate evidence that he had also won a daunting battle with death.

Mentors, Muses and Monsters

In Mentors, Muses & Monsters , edited and with a contribution by Elizabeth Benedict, author of the National Book Award finalist Slow Dancing , thirty of today's brightest literary lights turn their attention to the question of mentorship and influence, exploring the people, events, and books that have transformed their lives. The result is an astonishing collection of stirring, insightful, and sometimes funny personal essays.

The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid

Bill Bryson was born in the middle of the American century--1951--in the middle of the United States--Des Moines, Iowa--in the middle of the largest generation in American history--the baby boomers. As one of the funniest writers alive, he is perfectly positioned to mine his all-American childhood for memoir gold. Like millions of his generational peers, Bill Bryson grew up with a rich fantasy life as a superhero. In his case, he ran around his house and neighborhood wearing a jersey with a thunderbolt on it and a towel about his neck, vanquishing evildoers--in his head--as "The Thunderbolt Kid." Using his fantasy-life persona as a springboard, Bryson re-creates the life of his family in the 1950s in all its transcendent normality--a life at once familiar to us all and as far away and unreachable as another galaxy.

Running with Scissors

This is the true story of a boy whose mother (a poet with delusions of Anne Sexton) gave him away to be raised by her psychiatrist, a dead-ringer for Santa and a lunatic in the bargain. Suddenly, at age twelve, the author found himself living in a dilapidated Victorian in perfect squalor. The doctor's bizarre family, a few patients, and a pedophile living in the backyard shed completed the tableau. Here, there were no rules, there was no school. The Christmas tree stayed up until summer, and Valium was eaten like Pez. And when things got dull, there was always the vintage electroshock therapy machine under the stairs. It is at turns foul and harrowing, compelling and maniacally funny, but above all, it chronicles an ordinary boy's survival under the most extraordinary circumstances.

The Middle Place

At thirty-six, she had a marriage that worked, a couple of funny, active kids, and a weekly newspaper column. But even as a thriving adult, Kelly still saw herself as George Corrigan's daughter. A garrulous Irish-American charmer from Baltimore, George was the center of the ebullient, raucous Corrigan clan. He greeted every day by opening his bedroom window and shouting, "Hello, World!" Suffice it to say, Kelly's was a colorful childhood, just the sort a girl could get attached to.

Kelly lives deep within what she calls the Middle Place -- "that sliver of time when parenthood and childhood overlap" -- comfortably wedged between her adult duties and her parents' care. But she's abruptly shoved into a coming-of-age when she finds a lump in her breast -- and gets the diagnosis no one wants to hear. And so Kelly's journey to full-blown adulthood begins. When George, too, learns he has late-stage cancer, it is Kelly's turn to take care of the man who had always taken care of her -- and show us a woman as she finally takes the leap and grows up.

Helen Keller's Teacher

A brief biography of Helen Keller's teacher describing her childhood and life with her famous pupil.

Hope and Other Luxuries

Clare Dunkle seemed to have an ideal life--two beautiful, high-achieving teenage daughters, a loving husband, and a satisfying and successful career as a children's book novelist. But it's when you let down your guard that the ax falls. Just after one daughter successfully conquered her depression, another daughter developed a life-threatening eating disorder. Co-published with Elena Vanishing, the memoir of her daughter, this is the story--told in brave, beautifully written, and unflinchingly honest prose--of one family's fight against a deadly disease, from an often ignored but important perspective: the mother of the anorexic

The Pages in Between

In a unique, intensely moving memoir, Erin Einhorn finds the family in Poland who saved her mother from the Holocaust. But instead of a joyful reunion, Erin unearths a dispute that forces her to navigate the increasingly bitter crossroads between memory and truth.

How I Write

How I Write details the elements of writing and publishing a novel, and addresses all categories of fiction-from mystery/thriller/action titles to romance; from stand-alone narratives to series. It offers practical and inspiring advice on such subjects as structuring a plot and handling rejection. And it combines one of today's most successful fiction writers with Ina Yalof, a published non-fiction writer who teaches creative fiction. HOW I WRITE is the perfect reference for anyone looking to improve their writing, and for those fans who are hungry to find out more about just how Janet Evanovich ticks.

Castro's Daughter

"Mommy, mommy, call him. Tell him to come here right away. I have so many things to tell him "
I had a ton of things to tell him. I wanted him to find a solution to all the shortages of: clothes; of meat, so it would again be distributed through the ration books.
I also wanted to ask him to give our Christmas back. And to come live with us. I wanted to let him know how much we really needed him...
Fidel didn't answer my letter. I kept writing him letters from a sweet and well-behaved child, a brave but sad girl. Letters resembling those of a secret, spurned lover...

Designated Daughter

D.G. recalls how she and her mother--a pair who are opposites in almost every way, including how they unload the dishwasher--came together to learn what it means to be best friends, and to need each other in the truest sense. Sharing her experience of the lessons, expectations, and surprises involved with caregiving, D.G. also reveals her unique perspective as daughter, mother, and grandmother--and the wonderful ways to honor four generations of family. D.G.'s eighty-eight-year-old mother, Phyllis Greene, adds her own remarkable voice, contributing her point of view at the end of each chapter.

With humor and grace, D.G. and her mom talk about keeping in touch with D.G.'s two brothers as the entire family copes with the challenges and pleasures of change and transition. Woven throughout are the stories of other mothers and daughters who, despite many hardships and sacrifices, manage to draw from their mutual love and support and embrace these bonus years together as an opportunity to celebrate each other's insight.

Innocent Blood

A cunning, remorseless killer of sixteen--including three children--Charles Hatcher escaped justice for nearly 25 years, while an innocent man was jailed instead. Terry Ganey's award-winning reportage of the case makes this among the most powerful and chilling true-crime stories ever.

Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou's memoirs and books of essays and poetry have sold millions of copies. Now, MAYA ANGELOU: A GLORIOUS CELEBRATION offers an unusual and irresistible look at her life and her myriad interests and accomplishments. Created by the people who know her best--her longtime friends Marcia Ann Gillespie and Richard A. Long, and her niece Rosa Johnson Butler--it is part tribute, part scrapbook, capturing Angelou at home, at work, and in the public eye. In photographs, text, and ephemera, MAYA ANGELOU chronicles the writer's childhood in Stamps, Arkansas; her brief-but-illustrious career on the New York stage; her appointment as the Northern Coordinator for the Southern Christian Leadership Council; and more.

The Distance Between Us

When her parents make the dangerous and illegal trek across the Mexican border in pursuit of the American dream, Reyna and her siblings are forced to live with their stern grandmother, as they wait for their parents to build the foundation of a new life.

But when things don't go quite as planned, Reyna finds herself preparing for her own journey to "El Otro Lado" to live with the man who has haunted her imagination for years: her long-absent father. Both funny and heartbreaking, The Distance Between Us beautifully captures the struggle that Reyna and her siblings endured while trying to assimilate to a different culture, language, and family life in El Otro Lado (The Other Side).

Marley and Me

The heartwarming and unforgettable story of a family and the wondrously neurotic dog who taught them what really matters in life. Now with photos and new material.

Is it possible for humans to discover the key to happiness through a bigger-than-life, bad-boy dog? Just ask the Grogans.

John and Jenny were just beginning their life together. They were young and in love, with not a care in the world. Then they brought home Marley, a wiggly yellow furball of a puppy. Life would never be the same.

Marley grew into a barreling, ninety-seven-pound streamroller of a Labrador retriever. He crashed through screen doors, gouged through drywall, and stole women's undergarments. Obedience school did no good -- Marley was expelled.

But just as Marley joyfully refused any limits on his behavior, his love and loyalty were boundless, too. Marley remained a model of devotion, even when his family was at its wit's end. Unconditional love, they would learn, comes in many forms.

Burnt Toast

From America's most beloved comedic actress and the star of Desperate Housewives comes a personal, heartfelt, and often very funny manifesto on life, love, and the lessons we all need to learn -- and unlearn -- on the road to happiness.

Teri Hatcher secured her place in America's heart when she stood up to accept her Golden Globe for Best Actress and declared herself a "has-been" on national television. That moment showcased her down-to-earth, self-deprecating style -- and her frank openness about the ups and downs she's experienced in life and work.

But what the world might not have seen that night is that Teri's self-acceptance is the hard-won effort of a single mother with all the same struggles most women have to juggle -- life, love, bake sale cookies, and dying cats. Now, in the hope that her foibles and insights might inspire and motivate other women, Teri opens up about the little moments that have sustained her through good times and bad.

All Things Bright and Beautiful

A Yorkshire veterinarian describes the adventures and experiences of his career as he tends to sick cattle, pregnant ewes, ailing dogs, and their eccentric owners, in a celebration of the relationships between human and animal.

The Duchess of Windsor

Wallis, the Duchess of Windsor, was one of the most famous women in history, the American divorcee who captured the King of England, Edward VIII, and cost him his throne.

Seabiscuit

Retraces the journey of Seabiscuit, a horse with crooked legs and a pathetic tail that made racing history in 1938, thanks to the efforts of a trainer, owner, and jockey who transformed a bottom-level racehorse into a legend.

It Is Well with My Soul

An African American centenarian who saw W. E. B. Du Bois speak in 1924 and attended President Barack Obama's inauguration in 2009 shares wisdom from a life well lived during a crucial period in American history


Ella Mae Cheeks Johnson was an inspirational, dynamic, and one-of-a-kind woman, whose ordinary life was nothing less than extraordinary throughout the course of her 106 years. A graduate of Case Western Reserve University, Ella Mae was the child of former slaves and experienced the best and worst of the past century in America--from the Jim Crow era and the Great Depression to the inauguration of President Barack Obama in 2009, which she memorably attended. Through it all, she endured--and thrived--by adhering to the example of the Good Samaritan: the belief that compassion is the key to the good life and offering to help without expecting payback brings its own rewards. In It Is Well with My Soul , Ella Mae Cheeks Johnson shares her insights on living a long and enjoyable life and her hopes for the future.

The Perfect Storm

Presents a vivid account of a history-making storm that hit the New England coast in October 1991 and the lives it changed, weaving together the history of the fishing industry, the science of storms, and personal accounts.

Mountains Beyond Mountains

In medical school, Paul Farmer found his life's calling: to cure infectious diseases and to bring the lifesaving tools of modern medicine to those who need them most. Tracy Kidder's magnificent account shows how one person can make a difference in solving global health problems through a clear-eyed understanding of the interaction of politics, wealth, social systems, and disease. Profound and powerful, Mountains Beyond Mountains takes us from Harvard to Haiti, Peru, Cuba, and Russia as Farmer changes people's minds through his dedication to the philosophy that "the only real nation is humanity."

Strength in What Remains

In Strength in What Remains, Tracy Kidder gives us the story of one man's inspiring American journey and of the ordinary people who helped him, providing brilliant testament to the power of second chances. Deo arrives in the United States from Burundi in search of a new life. Having survived a civil war and genocide, he lands at JFK airport with two hundred dollars, no English, and no contacts. He ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores. Then Deo begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing. Kidder breaks new ground in telling this unforgettable story as he travels with Deo back over a turbulent life and shows us what it means to be fully human.

Moose

Stephanie Klein was an eighth grader with a weight problem. It was a problem at school, where the boys called her "Moose," and it was a problem at home, where her father reminded her, "No one likes fat girls." After many frustrating sessions with a nutritionist known as the fat doctor of Roslyn Heights, Long Island, Klein's parents enrolled her for a summer at fat camp. Determined to return to school thin and popular, without her "lard arms" and "puckered ham," Stephanie embarked on a memorable journey that would shape more than just her body. It would shape her life.

Born on the Fourth of July

This New York Times bestseller details the author's life story-from a patriotic soldier in Vietnam, to his severe battlefield injury, to his role as the country's most outspoken anti-Vietnam War advocate. Kovic served two tours of duty during the Vietnam War. He was paralyzed from his chest down in combat in 1968 and has been in a wheelchair ever since. Includes a new introduction by the author.

Isaac's Storm

September 8, 1900, began innocently in the seaside town of Galveston, Texas. Even Isaac Cline, resident meteorologist for the U.S. Weather Bureau failed to grasp the true meaning of the strange deep-sea swells and peculiar winds that greeted the city that morning. Mere hours later, Galveston found itself submerged in a monster hurricane that completely destroyed the town and killed over six thousand people in what remains the greatest natural disaster in American history--and Isaac Cline found himself the victim of a devastating personal tragedy.

Using Cline's own telegrams, letters, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the science of hurricanes, Erik Larson builds a chronicle of one man's heroic struggle and fatal miscalculation in the face of a storm of unimaginable magnitude. Riveting, powerful, and unbearably suspenseful, Isaac's Storm is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets the great uncontrollable force of nature.

Ghostbread

Ghostbread makes real for us the shifting homes and unending hunger that shape the life of a girl growing up in poverty during the 1970s. One of seven children brought up by a single mother, Sonja Livingston was raised in areas of western New York that remain relatively hidden from the rest of America. From an old farming town to an Indian reservation to a dead-end urban neighborhood, Livingston and her siblings follow their nonconformist mother from one ramshackle house to another on the perpetual search for something better.

'Tis

'Tis, the story of Frank's American journey from impoverished immigrant to brilliant teacher and raconteur. Frank lands in New York at age nineteen, in the company of a priest he meets on the boat. He gets a job at the Biltmore Hotel, where he immediately encounters the vivid hierarchies of this "classless country," and then is drafted into the army and is sent to Germany to train dogs and type reports. It is Frank's incomparable voice -- his uncanny humor and his astonishing ear for dialogue -- that renders these experiences spellbinding.

When Frank returns to America in 1953, he works on the docks, always resisting what everyone tells him, that men and women who have dreamed and toiled for years to get to America should "stick to their own kind" once they arrive. Somehow, Frank knows that he should be getting an education, and though he left school at fourteen, he talks his way into New York University. There, he falls in love with the quintessential Yankee, long-legged and blonde, and tries to live his dream. But it is not until he starts to teach -- and to write -- that Frank finds his place in the world.

The Other Wes Moore

The chilling truth is that his story could have been mine. The tragedy is that my story could have been his.

Two kids named Wes Moore were born blocks apart within a year of each other. Both grew up fatherless in similar Baltimore neighborhoods and had difficult childhoods; both hung out on street corners with their crews; both ran into trouble with the police. How, then, did one grow up to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader, while the other ended up a convicted murderer serving a life sentence? Wes Moore, the author of this fascinating book, sets out to answer this profound question. In alternating narratives that take readers from heart-wrenching losses to moments of surprising redemption, The Other Wes Moore tells the story of a generation of boys trying to find their way in a hostile world.

The Necklace

Four years ago, Jonell McLain saw a diamond necklace in a jewelry store window. The necklace aroused desire first, then a provocative question: What if we shared what we desired? Several weeks, dozens of phone calls, and a leap of faith later, Jonell bought the necklace with twelve other women. With vastly dissimilar histories and lives, the women transcended their individual personalities and politics to join together in an uncommon journey. Part charm, part metaphor, part mirror, the necklace weaves in and out of each woman's life, and comes to mean something dramatically different to each of them. What started as a quirky social experiment became something far richer and deeper, as the women transformed a symbol of exclusivity into a symbol of inclusiveness. They discovered that sharing the necklace was only the beginning: the more they shared with others, the more profound this experience became.

John Lennon: the Life

This masterly biography takes a fresh and penetrating look at every aspect of Lennon's much-chronicled life, including the songs that have turned him, posthumously, into a near-secular saint. In three years of research, Norman has turned up an extraordinary amount of new information about even the best-known episodes of Lennon folklore--his upbringing by his strict Aunt Mimi; his allegedly wasted school and student days; the evolution of his peerless creative partnership with Paul McCartney; his Beatle-busting love affair with a Japanese performance artist; his forays into painting and literature; his experiments with Transcendental Meditation, primal scream therapy, and drugs. The book's numerous key informants and interviewees include Sir Paul McCartney, Sir George Martin, Sean Lennon--whose moving reminiscence reveals his father as never seen before--and Yoko Ono, who speaks with sometimes shocking candor about the inner workings of her marriage to John.

The Last Lecture

The author, a computer science professor diagnosed with terminal cancer, explores his life, the lessons that he has learned, how he has worked to achieve his childhood dreams, and the effect of his diagnosis on him and his family

High on Arrival

The actor-musician-mother shares her lifelong battle with personal demons, incest, and near-fatal addictions in this astounding, outrageous, and often tender life story.

The Audacity to Win

The forty-fourth president's campaign manager reveals the strategies that he credits with Obama's successful primary and general elections, explaining how a combination of technology and grassroots organization is revolutionizing politics.

Running Away

When journalist Robert Andrew Powell finished his first marathon, he cried, cradled in his father's arms. Long distance runners understand where those tears come from, even if there are others who will never understand what drives someone to run 26.2 consecutive miles in a grueling mental and physical test. Powell's emotional reaction to completing the race wasn't just about the run, though. It was also about the joy and relief of coming back up after hitting rock bottom.

Running Away is the story of how one decision can alter the course of a life. Knocked down by a painful divorce and inspired by his father, Powell decided to change his mindset and circumstances. He moved to Boulder and began running in earnest for the first time in his life. Over the 26.2 chapters that follow, Powell grapples with his past relationships, gaining insight and hard-won discipline that give him hope for the future.

Dumbfounded

The only Jewish family in a luxury Fifth Avenue building of WASPs, the senior Rothschilds took over the responsibility of raising their grandson, Matt, after his mother left him for Italy and a fourth husband.

Iron and Silk

Salzman captures post-cultural revolution China through his adventures as a young American English teacher in China and his shifu-tudi (master-student) relationship with China's foremost martial arts teacher.

The Women of the House

The Women of the House is a trilogy of life stories of three women from three generations of one Georgia family. Author Jane Anne Mallet Settle, a fourth generation woman of the house and a witness to many chapters, spent two decades sifting through a wealth of their papers, letters, and photographs. She provides a uniquely detailed and well documented account of the happiness they find in friendships, marriages, children, and promising careers: a happiness that helps them survive hardships from the Civil War through the Great Depression, the loss of young children, and sudden widowhood before middle age. The foundation of their strength is an intangible inspiring life philosophy passed from one generation to the next and symbolized by a tangible link Heritage, the Jackson, Georgia, family home in which their lives were set for more than one hundred years.

The Notorious Benedict Arnold

Provides a biography of America's first traitor--Benedict Arnold--that reads like an adventure tale, full of heroism, treachery, battle scenes, and surprising twists.

Everything I Need to Know I Learned from a Children's Book

"What children's book changed the way you see the world?" Anita Silvey asked this question to more than one hundred of our most respected and admired leaders in society, and she learned about the books that shaped financiers, actors, singers, athletes, activists, artists, comic book creators, novelists, illustrators, teachers... Writers (Anna Quindlen, Sherman Alexie, Bobbie Ann Mason, Azar Nafisi, Angela Johnson, David McCullough, Ann Tyler, Dave Eggers, ); inventors and scientists (Steve Wozniak, Andrew Weaver); politicians and activists (Donna E. Shalala, Robert F. Kennedy Jr.); artists (Wendell Minor, Pete Seeger); and the media (Lesley Stahl, Scott Simon) are just some of the people who share their stories. The lessons they recall are inspiring, instructive, and illuminating. And the books they remember resonate as influential reading choices for families.

Highest Duty

On January 15, 2009, the world witnessed a remarkable emergency landing when Captain "Sully" Sullenberger skillfully glided US Airways Flight 1549 onto the Hudson River, saving the lives of all 155 passengers and crew. His cool actions not only averted tragedy but made him a hero and an inspiration worldwide. His story is now a major motion picture from director / producer Clint Eastwood and stars Tom Hanks, Laura Linney and Aaron Eckhart.

Sully's story is one of dedication, hope, and preparedness, revealing the important lessons he learned through his life, in his military service, and in his work as an airline pilot. It reminds us all that, even in these days of conflict, tragedy and uncertainty, there are values still worth fighting for--that life's challenges can be met if we're ready for them.

We've Always Had Paris... and Provence

For more than a quarter century, Patricia Wells, who has long been recognized as the leading American authority on French food, and her husband, Walter, have lived the life in France that many of us have often fantasized about. In this delightful memoir they share in two voices their experiences--the good, the bad, and the funny--offering a charming and evocative account of their beloved home and some of the wonderful people they have met along the way.

Zoya's Story

Zoya's Story is a young woman's searing account of her clandestine war of resistance against the Taliban and religious fanaticism at the risk of her own life. An epic tale of fear and suffering, courage and hope, Zoya's Story is a powerful testament to the ongoing battle to claim human rights for the women of Afghanistan.

Though she is only twenty-three, Zoya has witnessed and endured more tragedy and terror than most people do in a lifetime. Zoya grew up during the wars that ravaged Afghanistan and was robbed of her mother and father when they were murdered by Muslim fundamentalists. Devastated by so much death and destruction, she fled Kabul with her grandmother and started a new life in exile in Pakistan. She joined the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, which challenged the crushing edicts of the Taliban government, and she made dangerous journeys back to her homeland to help the women oppressed by a system that forced them to wear the stifling burqa, condoned public stoning or whipping if they ventured out without a male chaperon, and forbade them from working.

Zoya is our guide, our witness to the horrors perpetrated by the Taliban and the Mujahideen "holy warriors" who had defeated the Russian occupiers. She helped to secretly film a public cutting of hands in a Kabul stadium and to organize covert literacy classes, as schooling-branded a "gateway to Hell" -- was forbidden to girls. At an Afghan refugee camp she heard tales of heartrending suffering and worked to provide a future for families who had lost everything.

Losing It

Popular actress, Jenny Craig spokeswoman, and America's sweetheart Bertinelli reveals in this courageous and candid memoir her complicated past and how she took control of her own life to gain self-esteem and happiness. of bw photographs.

Persepolis 2

In 1984, Marjane flees fundamentalism and the war with Iraq to begin a new life in Vienna. Once there, she faces the trials of adolescence far from her friends and family, and while she soon carves out a place for herself among a group of fellow outsiders, she continues to struggle for a sense of belonging.

Finding that she misses her home more than she can stand, Marjane returns to Iran after graduation. Her difficult homecoming forces her to confront the changes both she and her country have undergone in her absence and her shame at what she perceives as her failure in Austria. Marjane allows her past to weigh heavily on her until she finds some like-minded friends, falls in love, and begins studying art at a university. However, the repression and state-sanctioned chauvinism eventually lead her to question whether she can have a future in Iran.

I Feel Bad about My Neck

A collection of essays offers a humorous look at the ups and downs of being a woman of a certain age, discussing the tribulations of maintenance and trying to stop the clock, menopause, and empty nests.

Popular Nonfiction

The Zookeeper's Wife

The true story of how the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands. When Germany invaded Poland, Stuka bombers devastated Warsaw--and the city's zoo along with it. With most of their animals dead, zookeepers Jan and Antonina Żabiński began smuggling Jews into empty cages. Another dozen "guests" hid inside the Żabińskis' villa, emerging after dark for dinner, socializing, and, during rare moments of calm, piano concerts. Jan, active in the Polish resistance, kept ammunition buried in the elephant enclosure and stashed explosives in the animal hospital. Meanwhile, Antonina kept her unusual household afloat, caring for both its human and its animal inhabitants--otters, a badger, hyena pups, lynxes--and keeping alive an atmosphere of play and innocence even as Europe crumbled around her.

Black Hawk Down

Destined to become a classic of war reporting, this is a brilliant account of the longest sustained firefight involving American troops since the Vietnam War. On October 3, 1993, about a hundred U.S. soldiers were dropped by helicopter into a teeming market in the heart of Mogadishu, Somalia, to abduct two top lieutenants of a Somali warlord. The action was supposed to take an hour. Instead, they spent a long and terrible night fighting thousands of armed Somalis. By morning, eighteen Americans were dead, and more than seventy badly injured. Mark Bowden's gripping narrative is one of the most exciting accounts of modern war ever written-a riveting story that captures the heroism, courage, and brutality of battle.

Money 911

Jean Chatzky, the popular Today Show financial editor and Oprah contributor, shows readers how to navigate the critical challenges and universal conundrums of personal finance in Money 911. A lifesaver in difficult economic times, Money 911 answers the tough financial questions about how to manage your money in the face of life-altering events. Like popular personal finance guru Suze Orman, Chatzky offers clear, optimistic, timely, and intelligent advice for any recession victim who might be suffering the slings and arrows of unanticipated economic misfortune.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Shaping the New You

A collection of 101 true personal stories from regular people about dieting and fitness.

Cosplay in America V2

A lush combination of portraiture and documentary photography, Cosplay in America Volume 2 takes us on a tour of fan conventions across the nation--from Comic-Con International in San Diego and Los Angeles's Anime Expo to Dragon Con in Atlanta and New York Comic Con--in celebration of the pastime of cosplay. The act of dressing up as characters from movies, manga, video games, and anime can require hundreds of hours of preparation and painstaking attention to detail, and with five hundred conferences per year in the United States attended by a dedicated community, the line between hobby and lifestyle blurs.

100 Scariest Things on the Planet

Packed full of the scariest things on Earth! What if you had to fight a great white shark? Or cross a wobbly wooden bridge? Or what if you were caught in a storm--and it looked like it was raining blood? You can hear about all of these terrifying things in 100 SCARIEST THINGS ON THE PLANET. If you've ever wondered about alien encounters, deadly creatures, and real-life monsters, then you'll love this compendium of all things scary! With interesting facts, side panels, and scariness ratings, children will enjoy reading about all the things that keep them up at night and learning the truth behind their favorite fears. And, best of all, they're sure to find new things to scream about!

100 Most Awesome Things on the Planet

As a follow up to the 100 Most Dangerous Things on the Planet (10/08) and the 100 Most Disgusting Things on the Planet (1/10), the 100 Most Awesome Things on the Planet highlights the Grand Canyon, Great Wall of China, Angel Falls, Amazon River, Aurora Borealis, biggest supertanker, longest bridge, smartest robot, fastest rocket, and more. Each spread includes a rating from 1 to 5 indicating how "awesome" the item is, along with amazing facts, quirky side panels, and lots of full-color photos.

100 Most Destructive Natural Disasters Ever

Presents information about cyclones, earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes, and other deadly natural disasters, and provides examples of some of the deadliest of each type in history.

100 Most Feared Creatures on the Planet

This book will explore the world's most ferocious creatures and reveal the deadliest facts about these terrifying animals. Who fights off predators by spraying blood from its eyes? How does the slender, deep-sea gulper swallow prey twice its size? Who sucks out body fluids with its short, sharp mouthparts? Readers will learn everything they ever wanted to know about some of the scariest creatures on the planet.

100 Deadliest Things on the Planet

Describes the one hundred most dangerous animals, plants, diseases, and weather on the planet, including scorpions, sharks, wolfsbane, killer bees, smallpox, tsunamis, and earthquakes.

House of Cards

William D. Cohan's superb and shocking narrative chronicles the fall of Bear Stearns and the end of the Second Gilded Age on Wall Street, explaining how a combination of risky bets, corporate political infighting, lax government regulations and truly bad decision-making wrought havoc on the world financial system.

The Cuisines of the Axis of Evil and Other Irritating States

Chris Fair has dined with soldiers in the Khyber Pass and with prostitutes in Delhi, rummaged for fish in Jaffna, and sipped Taliban tea in Peshawar. Cuisines of the Axis of Evil is a sophisticated, fun, and provocative cookbook with easy-to-follow recipes from both America's traditional enemies in foreign policy--including Iran, Iraq, and North Korea--and friends of the U.S. who are nonetheless irritating by any measure. In addition, each country section includes all the smart, acerbic geopolitical nuggetry you need to talk the talk with the best of them. Recipes include Iranian chicken in a walnut pomegranate stew, Iraqi kibbe, and North Korean spicy cucumber, as well as special teas, mango salads, beverage suggestions, and much more.

Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man

From the host of the popular Steve Harvey Morning Show comes a guide for all women that takes them inside the heads of men and shows how men think about love, sex, and commitment.

A Civil Action

A Civil Action is the searing, compelling tale of a legal system gone awry--one in which greed and power fight an unending struggle against justice. Yet it is also the story of how one man can ultimately make a difference. Representing the bereaved parents, the unlikeliest of heroes emerges: a young, flamboyant Porsche-driving lawyer who hopes to win millions of dollars and ends up nearly losing everything, including his sanity.

Survival

Encourages Americans to adopt a culture of disaster preparedness, drawing on examples from Hurricane Katrina to outline practical suggestions on how to prepare for and respond to catastrophic events.

Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism New and Expanded Ed

With Michael Jordan and the New Global Capitalism , Walter LaFeber has written a biography, a social history, and a far-ranging economic critique. From basketball prodigy to international phenomenon to seductive commercial ideal, Michael Jordan is the supreme example of how American corporations have used technology in a brave, massively wired new world to sell their products in every corner of the globe. LaFeber's examination of Nike and its particular dominion over the global marketplace is often scathing, while his fascinating mini-biography of Michael Jordan and the commercial history of basketball reveal much about American society. For this new paperback edition, LaFeber has added a chapter on globalization in a changed world, after mass protests and since September 11.

Mommy Millionaire

Real-world advice, secrets and lessons on how to make a million dollars from a mom who turned her kitchen table idea into a successful business while keeping her family and kids Job #1. MOMMY MILLIONAIRE will give you the tools you need to create your fortune, including:
* How to develop and patent an idea while saving thousands* How to make a cold call* How to get on QVC* How to work a trade show* How to develop an "elevator pitch"* How to break down the doors of big retailers* Everything you need to know about manufacturing and distribution* How to raise capital from Angel Investors
Crammed with detailed information designed to simplify the fundamentals of starting and running your own business, "Mommy Millionaire" is full of proven strategies for success, revealing rare insights and exclusive insider secrets nobody else will tell you about what it really takes to make a million dollars from your own home.

Live a Little!

Later to bed, munching some fries, makes a girl pretty healthy and wise. . . .
Yes, it's true-more or less. Why? Women do need to eat healthier, exercise, get adequate sleep, and take preventive health care seriously, yet it's equally important for them to relax. Relax, take a breather, and give up trying to follow the narrowly prescribed health "rules" that are constant sources of unhealthy stress and guilt.
In Live a Little! , women finally get a long-overdue dose of realism about what's truly healthy and what's mostly hype. Susan Love and Alice Domar take on the health police, whose edicts make us feel terrible when we don't get eight hours of sleep or eat the maximum daily serving of veggies. Most important, they remind us of a forgotten truth: Perfect health is not achievable.
Breaking down the prevailing health "musts" in six areas-sleep, stress, preventive care, exercise, nutrition, and personal relationships-these doctors, with a little help from the other experts of BeWell, cut to the heart of these topics and give us realistic guidelines for living a healthy enough life, one that also includes laughter, relaxation, and a commonsense attitude about being pretty healthy.

Three Cups of Tea

In 1993, following a failed attempt to ascend K2, Greg Mortenson was inspired by a chance encounter with impoverished mountain villagers in Pakistan and promised to build them a school. From that rash, earnest promise grew one of the most incredible humanitarian campaigns of our time--Mortenson's one-man mission to counteract extremism by building schools, especially for girls, throughout the breeding ground of the Taliban.

Dewey

The charming story of Dewey Readmore Books, the beloved library cat of Spencer, Iowa.

O's Big Book of Happiness

"You can't buy happiness, so why not grow your own? All you need is a piece of fertile ground (your beautiful mind) plus some hardy seeds of wisdom, creativity, and plain good sense. In this inspiring new collection from the pages of O, The Oprah Magazine, more than 75 warm, wise, and insightful contributors write about beating the blues, dropping the weight, kissing fear goodbye, making your dreams real, and putting your best face forward (with a little help from the right haircut, of course)

Become a Better You

Explains how to apply seven action steps to discover individual purpose and destiny, in a guide complemented by biblical principles, devotions, and personal testimonies.

Chateaux of the Loire Valley

The architectural heritage of the French kings is nowhere as present as in the Loire Valley. Magnificent castles, sophisticated gardens and sweeping parks demonstrate both the monarchs' power and appreciation of art, attracting and fascinating uncounted visitors to this day.

In Defense of Food

Food. There's plenty of it around, and we all love to eat it. So why should anyone need to defend it?

Because in the so-called Western diet, food has been replaced by nutrients, and common sense by confusion--most of what we're consuming today is longer the product of nature but of food science. The result is what Michael Pollan calls the American Paradox: The more we worry about nutrition, the less healthy we see to become. With In Defense of Food , Pollan proposes a new (and very old) answer to the question of what we should eat that comes down to seven simple but liberating words: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Pollan's bracing and eloquent manifesto shows us how we can start making thoughtful food choices that will enrich our lives, enlarge our sense of what it means to be healthy, and bring pleasure back to eating.

Letter to a Man in the Fire

Does God Exist and Does He Care?
In April 1997 Reynolds Price received an eloquent letter from a reader of his cancer memoir, A Whole New Life . The correspondent, a young medical student diagnosed with cancer himself and facing his own mortality, asked these difficultQuestions. The two began a long-distance correspondence, culminating in Price's thoughtful response, originally delivered as the Jack and Lewis Rudin Lecture at Auburn Theological Seminary, and now expanded onto the printed page as Letter to a Man in the Fire .
Harvesting a variety of sources -- diverse religious traditions, classical and modern texts, and a lifetime of personal experiences, interactions, and spiritual encounters -- Price meditates on God's participation in our fate. With candor and sympathy, he offers the reader such a rich variety of tools to explore these questions as to place this work in the company of other great testamentsof faith from St. Augustine to C. S. Lewis.

When You Are Engulfed in Flames

Trying to make coffee when the water is shut off, David considers using the water in a vase of flowers and his chain of associations takes him from the French countryside to a hilariously uncomfortable memory of buying drugs in a mobile home in rural North Carolina. In essay after essay, Sedaris proceeds from bizarre conundrums of daily life-having a lozenge fall from your mouth into the lap of a fellow passenger on a plane or armoring the windows with LP covers to protect the house from neurotic songbirds-to the most deeply resonant human truths.

Ghosts in the Fog

Ghosts in the Fog is the first narrative nonfiction book for young adults to tell the riveting story of how the Japanese invaded and occupied the Aleutian Islands in Alaska during World War II. This fascinating little-known piece of American history is told from the point of view of the American civilians who were captured and taken prisoner, along with the American and Japanese soldiers who fought in one of the bloodiest battles of hand-to-hand combat during the war. Complete with more than eighty photographs throughout and first person accounts of this extraordinary event, Ghosts in the Fog is sure to become a must-read for anyone interested in World War II and a perfect tie-in for the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Hidden Figures (Young Readers' Edition)

Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as "Human Computers," calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. Segregated from their white counterparts by Jim Crow laws, these "colored computers," as they were known, used slide rules, adding machines, and pencil and paper to support America's fledgling aeronautics industry, and helped write the equations that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Drawing on the oral histories of scores of these "computers," personal recollections, interviews with NASA executives and engineers, archival documents, correspondence, and reporting from the era, Hidden Figures recalls America's greatest adventure and NASA's groundbreaking successes through the experiences of five spunky, courageous, intelligent, determined, and patriotic women: Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, Christine Darden, and Gloria Champine.

Mean Mothers

Demonstrates what happens to a daughter's formulation of self and her relationships when her mother is either emotionally absent or, worse, cruel and unloving.

Strong at the Heart

Every year more than half a million young people are sexually abused or assaulted in North America. This groundbreaking book brings readers face-to-face with nine survivors who speak with candor and courage about the abuse they experienced, how they have healed, and how they are moving forward with their lives. White, black, Latino, and Native American, these everyday heroes come from a wide range of communities and have found different ways to cope with and overcome sexual trauma.

The Devil's Highway

Describes the attempt of twenty-six men to cross the Mexican border into the desert of southern Arizona, a region known as the Devil's Highway, detailing their harrowing ordeal and battle for survival against impossible odds. Only 12 men came back out.

Armageddon in Retrospect

Twelve previously unpublished writings on war and peace include such pieces as an essay on the destruction of Dresden, a story about the first-meal fantasies of three soldiers, and a meditation on the impossibility of shielding children from the temptations of violence.

Civil War Spies

Tells the stories of spies on both sides of the American Civil War.

I am Malala : How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World

Malala Yousafzai was only ten years old when the Taliban took control of her region. They said music was a crime. They said women weren't allowed to go to the market. They said girls couldn't go to school. Raised in a once-peaceful area of Pakistan transformed by terrorism, Malala was taught to stand up for what she believes. So she fought for her right to be educated. And on October 9, 2012, she nearly lost her life for the cause: She was shot point-blank while riding the bus on her way home from school. No one expected her to survive. Now Malala is an international symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize winner. In this Young Readers Edition of her memoir, which includes exclusive photos and material, we hear firsthand the story of a girl who knew from a young age that she wanted to change the world -- and did. Malala's story will open your eyes to another world and will make you believe in hope, truth, miracles and the possibility that one person -- one young person -- can inspire change in her community and beyond.

Escape : Children of the Holocaust

Features seven true stories of brave boys and girls who lived through the Holocaust. Their compelling accounts are based on exclusive, personal interviews with the survivors. Using real names, dates and places, these stories are factual versions of their recollections.

How to Draw Dynamic Comic Books

Among the few comics creators to be featured on US Postage Stamps, Rich Buckler is one of the best-known comic-book artists. He's drawn noted runs on Fantastic Four, Avengers, Spectacular Spider-Man, X-Men, Teen Titans, and more. Stan Lee says, "From the time he drew his first assignments for Marvel Comics, I've been one of his biggest fans. There are few people better qualified to write a book on the subject than Rich Buckler!" Now, Buckler reveals the secrets of drawing the heroic figure, the language of storytelling, narrative technique, and building a better page in focused chapters that build the reader's skills step by step--an authoritative guide to creating compelling comics.